Remembering With Gratitude

Posted January 7th, 2021

“At times, our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.” – Albert Schweitzer For those who spend time in a cancer treatment center, we encounter each other in a variety of […]


Cancer Treatment in the Age of COVID-19

Posted March 18th, 2020

Many patients are wondering if they should continue their cancer treatment in light of the current COVID-19 pandemic. The answer for most is “yes.” But there are some things to think about and plan for before going to your center. Should I still go to treatment? Currently, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) states […]


Why isn’t it ok to die?

Posted April 9th, 2018

A few weeks back the US House of Representatives passed a “Right to Try” Law. In all honesty, I don’t completely understand the need for this when compassionate use already exists, but that is a topic for another day. The discussions and news stories I heard surrounding this law got me contemplating, why isn’t it […]


Bob Riter

No Right Way Through Cancer

Posted November 20th, 2017

I often say that there’s no single right way through cancer. What do I mean by that? Some people aggressively treat their cancers with surgery and chemotherapy long past the time that others would have switched to comfort measures. Some people keep their cancer diagnosis a secret from nearly everyone while others make it a […]


Karen Arnold-Korzeniowski, BSN, RN

Use the Good Lip Balm

Posted September 21st, 2017

A few months ago a family member was diagnosed with incurable, but treatable cancer. She was hospitalized when she was diagnosed and stayed in the hospital while starting her treatment. Every imaging test she had showed more metastasis, and the bad news didn’t seem to end for about 5 days straight. It was very challenging […]


Bob Riter

The Post-Treatment Blahs

Posted August 22nd, 2017

For many people the months following cancer treatment are more difficult than the treatment itself.  During treatment, your “job” is to be in treatment. You’re busy with appointments and you see the same doctors and nurses almost every week. At the same time, friends bring you meals, family members take on extra duties, and you’re […]


Karen Arnold-Korzeniowski, BSN, RN

Are you breaking up with me?

Posted August 1st, 2017

While receiving cancer treatment as an outpatient, you are often spending much of your time at appointments, getting tests and scans and receiving  treatment. You will be spending your days with physicians (medical specialists, radiation oncologists, surgeons, etc), physician’s assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, assistants, techs, social workers, counselors, and the list can go on and […]


Bob Riter

Nice People Abound in the Cancer World

Posted March 1st, 2017

One of the volunteers at the Cancer Resource Center recently said to me, “Every person I meet with cancer is nice.” It’s an interesting observation and one that other volunteers have made as well. I’ve been in the cancer world for more than 20 years and I think it’s generally true. Not because nice people […]


OncoLink

Preparing for Proton Therapy- A Practical Guide for Patients and Caregivers

Posted March 24th, 2016

This webinar, presented by Katie McFadien, MSW, LSW, focuses on the practical concerns of proton therapy for both patients and caregivers.


Bob Riter

Twenty Years in the Cancer World

Posted December 7th, 2015

It’s been nearly 20 years since I was diagnosed with cancer. When I step back from my day-to-day work, I realize how much has changed during those two decades: There’s considerably less stigma associated with cancer than there used to be. Twenty years ago, many people felt the need to keep their cancer diagnosis a […]